s h i b a r i . n r w
s h i b a r i . n r w

A practical and rational approach to deal with terms in tying

Because of a recent discussion about terms, names and definitions in tying i want to give a rational approach on this topic. 

 

The original purpose of terms and definitions was to make communication more easy. Language was a great step in evolution in situations non verbal communication wasn‘t enough. When you cross a street and someone is shouting : „stop, there's a car coming.“. You are happy about the warning even if the approaching vehicle is a truck and not a car.

So the situation and the purpose are relevant for communication.

If one develops tying for themself there is no need to name techniques.


But if you start to teach you sooner or later use names for special ties because you want to talk about them with your students. It makes things more easy.

That however does not mean, that the next teacher has to use the same terms. But it is certainly good to know the „range of understandig“ of the words you use. Many discussions that get out of hand do not take this into account.

For example the statement: „In my experience dogs have fur, a long tail and bark“ can be totally true for this person. Maybe that is what the person experienced and therefore true for them. But nevertheless it is stupid to say such things in a discussion about terms and definitions because the term „dog“ is used by all english speaking people.

 

So if you are not a role model for the human race do not use this kind of argumentation that is based on personal experience in discussions about terms that we all have to use. The sentence: „For me shibari is…“ is maybe suitable to describe your experience but useless in giving a definition for shibari.

To give names and create terms is NOT a cultural way exclusive to the western world.


If a teacher uses the "demonstratory way" of teaching he creates the necessity for terms.
When a teacher guides the students to experience on their own, to understand the fundamentals, terms for specific ties are maybe not that necessary. But there is no wrong or right.

 

I’m studying japanese since many years. They have more then 500 000 words. I never had the impression it is an exclusive habit oft the western world to create terms. ?

 

At the end I would like to point out one special feature. When confronted with a term you should check if it is meant to be a name or a description. In school we learned to not translate names. But if a japanese guy creates a tie and describes the shape with japanese words its possible to translate it. Then it is a description not a name.

 

Conclusion:
The purpose of terms and definitions is to make communication more easy.
The situation and the purpose matters in understanding terms.
Terms that are used by many should be keept broad in scope of meaning.
Descriptions can be used as names but can also be translated.

Druckversion Druckversion | Sitemap
© Shibari NRW